Past Events

Membership Year October 2019 – September 2020

  • October 2019 / SATEFL 40th Anniversary Event at The Albert Hall, Stirling, Saturday 5th October 2019

We are very pleased to announce that Mark Hancock and Annie McDonald will be joining us for our forthcoming 40th anniversary celebratory event. As this is a special event for us, we will also be welcoming stands by friends and colleagues from BALEAP, The Glasgow ESOL Forum, INTO, Live Language and many more!

 

  • March 2020 / Glasgow / Speaker: Penny Hands

We are excited to welcome Penny Hands as our main speaker who will present her talk, ‘COBUILD English Usage: evolving language in a changing world’.

Following the success of the Refuweegee workshop last year, we will also be teaming up with the Glasgow branch of charity, ‘Nightstop’, to present an interactive workshop with a takeaway lesson for all attendees.

 

Membership Year October 2018 – September 2019

  • October 2018 / Stirling / Speaker: Louis Rogers

We are very pleased to have Louis Rogers talk at our SATEFL Day at the University of Stirling this year. Louis has been an English language teacher for over 10 years, working in the UK, Germany, Portugal, and Italy. Much of this teaching has been to adults or young adults and mostly variations of English for specific purposes, in particular – Exams, Business English and EAP.

10:30 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book display

11:00 – Talk 1: 9 effective study skills techniques

This talk focuses on 9 study skill techniques and compares the effectiveness of these compared to each other.How effective are the skills our students commonly use such as highlighting and test practice? Are there more effective techniques that are rarely taught and how can we integrated these into the classroom?

12:00 – Lunch included and time to browse the Macmillan book stand
13:00 – Talk 2: Critical thinking in learning and teaching

Critical thinking skills are a critical part of nearly all language learning environments, but even more so in an EAP setting. This session will look at what we mean by critical thinking and explores how it is involved at every stage of the teaching and learning process. It will also demonstrate some practical activities to stimulate critical thinking in the classroom.

14:00 – Close

 

  • December 2018 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Stacey Holliday Hughes  (including AGM)

The next SATEFL event is taking place at Edinburgh School of English again, along with the AGM. The event is supported by Oxford University Press, who is providing the speaker for the day and will be present with a book stall and representative.

We are very pleased to have Stacey Holliday Hughes talk at our event. Stacey is a part-time lecturer at Oxford Brookes University and also works freelance as a teacher developer, materials writer and educational consultant in ELT. She has taught English in the US, Poland, Italy and the UK in many different contexts. She also taught French and Spanish. As a teacher developer, she enjoys engaging with teachers from all over the world. She has recently run an introduction to teacher training course for the Oxford Department of Education Summer School. Stacey has written a number of blogs, online student exercises and teacher support materials. She gained her Master’s degree in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in 1993.

Book stalls:

  • Oxford University Press book stall at event will include sample books to browse and read plus resources details from book representative.

10:00 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book displays

10:30 – SATEFL AGM

11:00 – Stacey Holliday Hughes talk and discussion

Speaking in context: Research has shown that teaching grammar in context facilitates learning of structures. In addition to using context for presenting grammar, teachers can extend the context to help students use English for oral communication. This talk presents practical ways teachers can contextualise language in order for students to practice meaningful speaking.

12:00 – Coffee and biscuits

12:30 – Close

 

March 2019 / Glasgow / Speaker: Dr. Vander Viana

Presentation topic. Learning (about) English: How can you benefit from online corpora?

A talk from Dr Vander Viana delivering an interactive presentation on how we can use online resources to help with language, register or word combinations.

Plus a presentation detailing Refuweegee support for forcibly displaced people living in Glasgow – find out what they do and how you can help!

Membership Year October 2017 – September 2018

October 2017 / Stirling / Speaker: Olha Madylus

This event is supported by Cambridge University Press, who is providing the speaker for the day and will be present with a book stall and representative.

We are very pleased to have Olha Madylus talk at our SATEFL Day at the University of Stirling this year. Olha has lived in Greece, Hong Kong and Venezuela teaching students of all ages. As well as General English she has taught Business, ESP and Academic English. She is now based in London. She is a CELTA trainer and develops training materials for teachers and teacher trainers around the world. She is the author of “Film, TV and Music’, a book of photocopiable activities published by Cambridge University Press.

10:30 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book display

11:00 – Developing speaking skills by Olha Madylus

If you are a teenager or adult learning a new language, there are many reasons why it can be difficult to engage in speaking tasks or even just produce more than single word utterances in any oral exchange, for example when the teacher asks if you had a good weekend as you enter the classroom. The words and phrases are there somewhere, but just can’t be found and delivered when needed. It can be frustrating and even embarrassing. It’s hard work for the student and the teacher.

Teachers need to understand the challenges students face producing spoken English and this presentation explores these and moves on to identify a number of classroom strategies which allow students to not only develop individual speaking skills, but to pull them together in tasks and feel a sense of success instead of frustration.
Tasks which focus on learning high frequency generic expressions as well as using scaffolding and simple dialogue signposting will be presented. In addition, the role of preparation and rehearsal will be explored. The session also introduces games and role plays which develop speaking skills in addition to the use of DVDs in class to support speaking.

12:00 –  Lunch, networking and browsing books and resources

13:30 – Language strategies – how can we guide our students to learn to infer linguistic and cultural meaning? by Carol Irvine

How do native-speakers (NS) handle conversational exchanges in ways that might not be obvious to overseas students or any non-native- speakers (NNS) of English who have to function in British society? What might go wrong, as a result, and what are some implications for our teaching? This short session is an awareness-raising exercise where we will look at real examples of NS and NNS spoken exchanges, examining the extent to which the intended communicative event is successful, misunderstood, obscure, or just plain awful . Although most of the examples are taken from university studies, they cover both academic exchanges (with tutors and lecturers) and the ordinary everyday situations that students engage in on campus.

 This will be followed by two short workshops with hands-on strategies and tips on developing speaking skills by Clare Hayward and Eloise Bicket.

14:30 – Final questions and answer and close

 

 

  • December 2017 / Edinburgh / Speaker:  Susan Holden

Presentation topic: ‘From ideas to reality: making critical choices’

We are very pleased to have Susan Holden talk at our SATEFL event at Edinburgh School of English.

Susan Holden is based in Callander, where she runs a small ELT publishing company.  She has had a long and varied career in the ELT world, involving  teaching, teacher training, writing, editing and publishing. This has included work in Central and Eastern Europe at a time of transition and change in the 90s, and in Latin America (especially Brazil) for over a decade. As editor of MET magazine for over 15 years, and ELT Publishing Director at Macmillan and then Prentice Hall, before setting up her own company twenty years ago, she has seen the ELT writing and publishing world from a number of different viewpoints – both positive and negative.

Continuing: Tried and Tested! We would like to revive this once popular feature where SATEFL members share their favourite activities. Seen something great at IATEFL, do share it with us.

10:00 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book display

10:30 –  Susan Holden talk and discussion

‘From ideas to reality: making critical choices’ We will discuss how ideas for teaching, learning and training materials are shaped by practicalities, feedback and changing realities, using the development of  Péter Medgyes ‘The Non-Native Teacher’ as a practical working example.’

11.30 – Coffee and biscuits

12:00 – Close

 

March 2018 / Glasgow / Speaker: Stacey Holliday Hughes (including AGM)

The next SATEFL event is taking place at the University of Glasgow again, along with the AGM. The event is supported by Oxford University Press, who is providing the speaker for the day and will be present with a book stall and representative.

We are very pleased to have Stacey Holliday Hughes talk at our event. Stacey is a part-time lecturer at Oxford Brookes University and also works freelance as a teacher developer, materials writer and educational consultant in ELT. She has taught English in the US, Poland, Italy and the UK in many different contexts. She also taught French and Spanish. As a teacher developer, she enjoys engaging with teachers from all over the world. She has recently run an introduction to teacher training course for the Oxford Department of Education Summer School. Stacey has written a number of blogs, online student exercises and teacher support materials. She gained her Master’s degree in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in 1993.

After a short break,  Dangeni, who is currently working on her PhD at the University of Glasgow, will talk about her research topic, ‘an in-depth investigation of challenges Chinese students face in British higher education’ and would like to hear what you think.

10:00 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book displays

10:30 – SATEFL AGM

11:00 – Stacey Holliday Hughes talk and discussion

Speaking in context: Research has shown that teaching grammar in context facilitates learning of structures. In addition to using context for presenting grammar, teachers can extend the context to help students use English for oral communication. This talk presents practical ways teachers can contextualise language in order for students to practice meaningful speaking.

12:00 – Coffee and biscuits

12:15  – Dangeni’s research

12:30 – Close

 

  • May 2018 / Perth / Speaker: Gemma Archer, Louise Guyett, Ewa Wanat

The next SATEFL event is taking place at Perth College UHI: Pronunciation teaching in Scotland: what, why and how’

Talks by Gemma Archer (University of Strathclyde); Louise Guyett (The English Studio, Dublin);
and Ewa Wanat (University of Glasgow)  each giving a 45 minutes presentation regarding the following:

‘Pronunciation can be regularly overlooked in the Scottish EFL classroom. The outcome? Teachers who are often unsure of how to implement pronunciation beyond the prestige RP accents of most published materials, and a student body struggling to decode the fast connected speech they hear everyday. This series of presentations aims to discuss the realities of teaching pronunciation in Scotland and will have suggestions for models, materials and strategies to share with learners.’

10:00 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book displays

10:30 – Gemma Archer: ‘Do pronunciation models matter?’

11:15 – Ewa Wanat: ‘Rhythmic training techniques for comprehending
connected speech’

12:00 – Coffee and biscuits

12:15  – ’Louise Guyett: ‘Designing personalised pronunciation
worksheets in a specific context​’

13:30 – Close

Membership Year October 2016 – September 2017

  • October 2016 / Stirling / Speaker: Péter Medgyes 

We are very pleased to have Péter Medgyes talk at our SATEFL Day at the University of Stirling this year. Péter, CBE, is Professor Emeritus of Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy. During his career he was a schoolteacher, teacher trainer, vice rector, vice president of IATEFL, deputy state secretary and ambassador of Hungary. He has been a plenary speaker in nearly 50 countries and author of numerous books and articles published both in Hungary and abroad.

10:30 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book display

11:00 – Always look on the bright side – being a non-native teacher

The bad news is that we are linguistically handicapped – there is no way we can emulate native speakers in terms of their English-language competence. The good news is that we can (a) provide a better learner model for imitation; (b) teach language learning strategies more effectively; (c) supply learners with more information about the English language; (d) anticipate and prevent language difficulties more successfully; (e) be more empathetic to the needs and problems of learners; (f) make better use the the learners’ mother tongue. The aim of this plenary is to discuss these controversial claims, with the final message that natives and non-natives are potentially equally effective teachers.

12:15 –  Lunch and networking

13:30 – Elfies at large – Beware!

It is common knowledge that English has become the Lingua Franca the world over. Today the overwhelming majority of communication takes place between nonnative users of English, often in the absence of native speakers. Given this, proponents of the ELF movement, whom I call elfies in my lecture, claim that native English standards need not be followed any longer. After I have subjected this assumption to critical analysis, I conclude that teachers had better follow their own agenda and satisfy their learners’ genuine needs, instead of listening to elfies – or any other researchers, for that matter.

14:30 – Final questions and answer and close

 

  • December 2016 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Diane Hopkins (and AGM)

Presentation topic: ‘Teaching your grandma to suck eggs or teaching your grammar to success? Integrating grammar into the IELTS writing syllabus.’

We are very pleased to have Diana Hopkins talk at our SATEFL event at Edinburgh School of English. Diana Hopkins has been working in the area of English Language Teaching for over 30 years.  She has worked in the UK, China, Japan, Turkey, Bangladesh and Malaysia teaching students from a range of backgrounds and levels.  For the past eighteen years she has worked at the University of Bath as a teacher trainer, teaching Cambridge CELTA and Delta courses, as well as lecturing on the MA TESOL programme, and her current role is to manage the programme that offers discipline-specific lectures on Academic Writing to all first year students.  She also tutored on the Open University MA in Applied Linguistics for ten years.  Her publications include: Passport to IELTSDeveloping Grammar in Context, and Cambridge Grammar for IELTS.  She has provided training presentations at a variety of conferences and organisations.

10:00 – Registration, refreshments and time to browse the book display

10:30 – SATEFL AGM

11:00 –  Diana Hopkins talk and discussion

IELTS is not just a hoop for students to jump through on their way to Higher Education.  Success in IELTS should provide students with the skills and language knowledge that can be built on when they reach an academic environment.  When most students think about the grammar they need for IELTS, they probably think of tenses and perhaps articles and discourse markers.  This talk will demonstrate that, as teachers of IELTS, there are other key grammatical areas that need our attention in order to develop students’ accuracy in academic discourse.

12:15  – Returning this year: ‘Tried and Tested!’ We would like to revive this once popular feature where SATEFL members share their favourite classroom activities

12:45 – Coffee and biscuits

13:00 – Close

 

  • March 2017 / Glasgow / Speaker: Carol Irvine

Presentation topic: ‘Widening Access to Higher Education with EAP courses’

We are very pleased to have have Carol Irvine Talk at our SATEFL event at Glasgow University. Carol Irvine is EAP Tutor and Course Director at EAS, in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Glasgow University. In being involved in this widening access project, she drew on her skills and earlier experience in working in the ESOL field where refugees formed ( and continue to form) a significant part of the student body.

10:00 – Registration and refreshments

10:30 – Talk by Carol Irvine

What happens when refugees, settled in a local community, wish to get their professional or academic lives back on track?  This talk/workshop will describe the role that an HE institution played in meeting this challenge in 2016, by providing free places on the EAS subject-specific intensive summer course It will consider the role of stakeholders, and the implications for a university-wide, multi-disciplinary approach, for this to be developed in 2017. it is hoped that ESOL colleagues will be willing to share their own views and experiences on this process

11:30 – Coffee and biscuits

11:45  – ‘Tried and Tested!’ After the successful re-launch of this feature we are sharing more classroom tips and tricks with you

12:00 – Close

 

  • May 2017 / Dundee / Speaker: Mary Fawcett

Presentation topic:

1 How can an understanding of the role of sounds and rhythm in English improve speaking and comprehension skills?

2 How can this be effectively applied to curriculum design in Young Learner Summer programmes?

The talk will:

  • Identify the challenges facing learners in understanding and being understood in English
  • Look at the structure and rules of spoken English
  • Examine the roles that sound and rhythm play in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing and the extent to which this can improve comprehension and communication
  • Look at how the Edinburgh School of English Young Learners’ Summer School curriculum has been designed to reflect the key role that phonology plays in improving communication for all students at all levels.

SATEFL is returning to Dundee this spring and we are delighted to Mary Fawcett as our speaker for the day, who has not one but TWO related topics for us. This is Mary’s introduction:

In the 1980s I travelled extensively in South America teaching English, developing an understanding of some of the barriers to language learning. I studied the ‘Silent Method’ of teaching, which has continued to influence both my teaching and work on curriculum design with its needs led, learner centred approach. In 1985 I gained the RSA Diploma in TEFL (Distinction). From 1998-2014 I taught music in the primary sector in Aberdeenshire, which gave me an insight into the links between music and spoken language. I devised a system of music notation for pupils with additional needs. This became so popular that it was adopted by all the pupils and allowed me to recognise the need for a flexible, creative and reactive approach to both teaching and curriculum design. In 2014 I moved to Edinburgh, where I continued to teach and for the last two years have been the Director of Studies for the Edinburgh School of English Young learners’ Summer school. This has given me the opportunity to totally re-design and deliver a brand new course, which focuses on the role that phonology plays in improving communication for all students at all levels. The wide-ranging changes continue to be developed but so far the course has received extremely good feedback from students, teachers and the British Council during their recent inspection.

Cambridge University Press book stall at event will include sample books to browse and read plus resources details from book representative

 

Membership Year October 2015 – September 2016

  • October 2015 / Stirling/ Speaker: Fiona Mauchline 

We are very pleased to have had Fiona Mauchline talk at our SATEFL Day at the University of Stirling this year. Fiona is based in Western Spain, where she divides her time between the classroom, teacher training and writing materials. Her publications include secondary courses Interface, All Clear and Motivate (Macmillan), the resource book Using Graded Readers in the Classroom (Macmillan) and materials for CUP, and she has four blogs, including macappella and Take a photo and… She also co-curates the #Eltpics photo resource.

Integrating skills, integrating people – Integrated skills, as an approach to teaching, is not only natural and highly effective as a way to build confidence and improve motivation, but it can also be used to provide dynamic opportunities for collaboration and cooperation between students. Add to this the chance to increase creativity, access imagination and tackle critical thinking, and it seems the ideal way to approach the ELT classroom.

12:15 Lunch and book displays

13:30 ‘Me’ is for memorable, meaningful: the learner-centred course book

‘Me’ is for memorable, meaningful: the learner-centred course book – Current course books have moved away from the ‘describe your house/last holiday format of earlier materials as content/culture-based learning and model texts take pole position. The content may be more challenging, but is it memorable? How do we personalise it all? Where do the ‘Me Moments’ come in? Fiona’s workshop will look at a wealth of creative, learner-centred activities to the put the ‘Me’ back into memorable and meaningful lessons for teens and adults alike.

 

  • December 2015 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Penny Hands (followed by AGM)

Presentation topic. Tradition and innovation: an example of collaboration in designing a course for a local context.

This talk describes the challenges and rewards of a British­–Indian collaboration to design the localised course Collins Exploring English for Indian primary schools. Penny will describe her exploratory visit to India and her initial reaction to a traditional literature-based approach. She will give details of solutions found and suggest that innovation and creativity can spring from some unlikely places.

The speaker. Penny Hands is an ELT editor and materials writer whose main interests lie in innovative teacher resources, vocabulary and grammar materials and the use of digital media in the classroom. She has taught English as a foreign language in France and the UK and, as a freelance editor and author, works regularly with major ELT publishers and author.

 

  • March 2016 / Glasgow / Speaker: Claire Hunter 

Presentation topic: Using TED Talks in English Language Teaching

The free TED website is a rich resource, a store of videoed talks and presentations by some of the world’s best and most engaging thinkers. This workshop will examine ways of exploiting this authentic source with different levels and class types. Activities presented will include a focus on exploiting the inspirational content, as well as on language work.

The speaker

Claire Hunter is the Academic Manager at Edinburgh School of English. She has worked as a teacher and teacher trainer, and has a special interest in preparing students for the IELTS test, using video in the classroom (particularly TED talks!), and syllabus and course design. She has led workshops for teachers throughout the UK and Ireland, and has spoken at conferences including IATEFL, ETpLive! and the English UK Teachers’ Conference.

 

  • May 2016 / Perth / Speaker: Steve Brown 

Presentation topic: Emancipating, indoctrinating, or somewhere in between? Exploring the purpose of ESOL in Scotland.

This workshop invites ESOL practitioners to explore their practice by analysing its impact, not just on learners but on the society they are now a part of.  Participants will examine the effectiveness of courses and activities in terms of what they allow learners to do as members of Scottish society, sharing and developing practical ideas for making the ESOL classroom a source of positive transformation as well as one of effective language learning.

The Speaker. Steve Brown started his ELT career in 1993 as a volunteer in Mongolia. A period with International House included spells in Romania, Czech Republic, Hungary and South Africa, where he was Director of Studies and a CELTA trainer. Steve has worked in the Scottish FE sector since 2002 in various lecturing, teacher training and management roles. He is currently Curriculum and Quality Leader for the Languages department at West College Scotland, and is also studying for an EdD at Glasgow University.

Membership Year October 2014 – September 2015

  • October 2014 / Stirling / Speakers:  Ian Badger and Gillian Scott

What a fascinating and interesting day with presentations beneficial to both EFL and ESOL sectors as well as prime networking opportunities!

First, Ian Badger’s ‘Understanding English however it it spoken’ explored ways of using authentic listening materials with our learners to help them cope with the challenges they meet in their everyday life, studies and work.  He showed us listening and audio texts referring to authentic (non transcript spoken utterances or conversations) training pieces that our students feel the need to receive.

He detailed how to use / record authentic pieces and the reasons why it is advantageous.  He highlighted content vs. pronunciation as well as the importance of cultural awareness.

Gillian Scott’s: ‘Putting the accent on listening’  about the development of a pack from WEA Highland who tried to address the immediate linguistic needs of local migrant workers by creating lesson plans based on scripted audio recordings with local accents.  She detailed how the project came about due to the level of immigrants rising.  Furthermore, Gillian outlined who needs these types of lessons, what they may contain and their stages and planning.  Examples of the workbooks were shown including pre-listening, while listening and post-listening activities.  Outcomes and lessons learnt were listed with mention of possible future projects.

 

  • December 2014 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Richard Smith 

Presentation topic: ELT research and teacher-research – What, why and how.

His presentation considered the issues of what ELT research is, how it can be made more accessible and relevant to practitioners, and why research is needed at all. It also addressed the question of how teachers themselves can get involved in research, highlighting the potential benefits of teacher-research, that is, research initiated by teachers and carried out in their own classrooms. The steps that can be gone through were described, from conception of a research ‘issue’ to sharing of findings, with illustration from recent work with teachers in various countries.

Richard Smith is an Associate Professor in the Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, where he teaches on the MA and PhD in ELT programmes He compiled the British Council’s Directory of UK ELT Research (2005-2012) and is coordinator of IATEFL’s Research Special Interest Group and editor of the ELT Journal’s ‘Key Concepts’ feature. He has published and presented widely in the fields of ELT research, history of language teaching, and language learner and teacher autonomy.

 

  • March 2015 / Glasgow / Speaker: Dr. Naeema Hann (School of Languages, Leeds Metropolitan University)

Presentation topic: Learner Strategies Outside the Classroom –ESOL learners mining L2 environments

As a learning strategy for English language learners, interaction – especially with native speakers – is an important factor. The session discussed some findings from a study of strategies used by successful ESOL learners, in encouraging and inviting interaction with native speakers outside their classrooms.

Membership Year October 2013 – September 20214

  • October 2013 / Stirling / Speaker: Jeremy Harmer 

Presentation topic: Yes, but why do we need teachers at all?

Jeremy opened with comments on a recent TED talk regarding an experiment to question whether teachers were needed at all and the growth of SOLEs (Self Organised Learning Environments).  He quoted a fellow writer’s opinion that teachers can motivate, correct and provide feedback or structure and asked us the audience to comment on who does what and how do we (teachers) intervene.

What makes language practice good language practice?

Jeremy’s follow up talk shared ideas about good practice not always being the same as free expression.  He gave some examples of language practice and some more improved practices that were more engaging and memorable for students.  He also provided the criteria from Penny Ur and Scott Thornbury on what good practice activities should include such as valid, communicative and focused practice.  He asked the audience to participate and suggest ideas for practice and we offered:  write a diary, talk to your dog or cat and record + listen back.  He concluded with the idea of using poems to improve language practice.

 

  • December 2013 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Richard Hamilton

Presentation topic: Undermeanings – Grammar teaching suffers when we focus on all the ‘surface’ rules. What are the deeper concepts that underlie the rules? We discover how to enhance our teaching by looking at some of the meanings beneath the rules.

Richard gave a great presentation about getting to grips with the nitty gritty elements of grammar with your learners. He talked us through modal verbs, tenses and relative clauses – pet hates for some of us!  His explanations were clear and helpful plus he provided us with classroom activities to try.

 

  • March 2014 / Glasgow / Speakers: Orsi Dunn, ESOL Tutor and Development Worker & Aileen Pollacchi, ESOL Literacies Tutor from  North Ayrshire Council

Presentation topic: Journeys into literacy for ESOL Learners

The speakers delivered a helpful and engaging presentation on helping ESOL learners with their literacy development.  They provided definitions on pre-literate, non-literate, semi-literate and non Roman alphabet literate and talked about how literacy training is essential to address the individual’s needs.  There were lots of opportunities to look at helpful materials plus ideas were shared and discussions included provision restrictions, funding and other problems felt by this particular sector.

Our March event was dedicated to the tremendous work contributed to the ESOL and EFL sectors by Esther Dunbar who passed away late 2013. Anne Marie Bradley gave a well-worded and fitting tribute to Esther which was appreciated by all who attended – many of whom knew, worked and possibly were trained by Esther.

Esther worked for some years as an EFL teacher at Basil Paterson’s College in Edinburgh, after which she worked in EAP at the EFL Unit at Glasgow University. Latterly she worked in the ESOL Section of Anniesland College in Glasgow, up until her retirement. As part of her busy life, she also served as Chair of SATEFL, she was on the committee of TESOL Scotland, and she was Chair of the Board of Directors of Glasgow ESOL Forum. As the SATEFL event in March has an ESOL theme, and as Esther happily worked between and across the two fields, we felt it would be fitting to compile a book of remembrance, to send to her husband and son. Participants will have the chance to record a greeting, a reminiscence, or a message of sympathy.

 

  • May 2014 / Dundee / Speaker: Susan Holder

Presentation topic: THE WORLD IT IS A-CHANGING – implications for teachers, learners and materials providers.

Teachers, materials writers and course planners find themselves increasingly confronted with both opportunities and challenges which did not exist even 10 years ago.  Similarly, learners and prospective learners feel an increasing urgency to learn and use English for their own personal and professional reasons.

While the possibilities are exciting, the reality can often be frustrating.  The workshop explored the aims and objectives of  the participants and their students. It focused on discussing and finding answers, or identifying areas for further investigation.

Membership Year October 2012 – September 2013

  • October 2012 / Stirling / Speaker:  Adrian Underhill

Presentation topics: “Make pronunciation physical, visible, audible!” and “A multi-experience approach.”

  • December 2012 / Edinburgh / Speaker: John Field

John Field is a Senior Lecturer at CRELLA (Centre for Research in English Language Learning and Assessment) at the University of Bedfordshire. He also teaches cognitive approaches to second language acquisition at the Faculty of Education, Cambridge University. He specialises in second language listening, on which he has written widely. For his book, Listening in the Language Classroom (CUP, 2008), he drew upon some 25 years of teaching and reflecting on the skill. This book won the international Ben Warren Prize for its contribution to language pedagogy. He brings a knowledge of psycholinguistics to much of his teaching and research and has written introductory books and a widely-used reference work (Psycholinguistics: The Key Concepts) in this area.

  • March 2013 / Glasgow / Speaker:John Hughes 

Presentation topic: Putting LIFE into reading lessons

The factors which affect our choice of reading texts for learners often seem to be in conflict. Teachers want texts which are authentic, challenging and content-rich but at the same time at a linguistic level which does not deter the learner. In addition, students will respond to texts which reflect their real life interests. In this workshop we’ll look at how to resolve these conflicts and try out some practical activities which help learners to confront extensive and cognitively-demanding readings taken from National Geographic magazine.

John introduced his presentation by how to motivate students to read longer texts. Furthermore, he reminded us of studying our students to establish the type of people they are and research data shows our ‘generation Y’ are used to visual rather than textural, they are referred to as ‘screenagers’ and info addicts and are multi-taskers and co-operators.

Therefore we may need to change our approach when teaching them reading. He went on to talk about engaging the learners with four basic approaches: making reading a co-operative activity, use info-rich texts, develop a critical mindset and integrate visual media. He encouraged us to think about the level of authenticity compared to the students’ level and for us to use realistic texts that students will deal with.

Finally in true EFL fashion he provided plenty of practice with our neighbours making it a very engaging session which we found very beneficial and no doubt some of us have put into good use this week!

John Hughes started teaching English over twenty years ago and since then has worked in Austria, Poland, Italy, Malta and the USA. He’s been a Director Studies and Head of Teacher Training for a UK school. Nowadays he runs training and workshops for teachers from all over the world both face-to-face and online. He’s been author and co-author of numerous books for Heinle Cengage Learning including Spotlight on FCE, Practical Grammar levels 1, 2 and 3, Success with BEC Vantage and Total Business 2. More recently he has been working on two new course series using resources from National Geographic magazine: Life is a general English adult course and Aspire is for secondary level schools.

 

  • May 2013 / Aberdeen / Speaker: Francis Marnie

Presentation topic: The Challenge of Beginners

Membership Year October 2011 – September 2012

  • October / Stirling / Speakers: Hugh Dellar and John Hird

Over 80 TEFL colleagues and students attended this event and enjoyed the presentations and workshops. This conference centred round the input from 2 guest speakers: Hugh Dellar from University of Westminster who spoke on Memorisation, Revision and Recycling and John Hird, author of the textbooks Inside Out and Move, whose topic was Spoken Grammar and Keeping Grammar Real, based on the OUP textbook, Grammar Step by Step.

Hugh Dellar – Vocabulary: Memorisation, Revision and Recycling

Is your white board blank or only covered in a few single words at the end of a lesson? We were challenged to think about what our students would have to take away with them after a lesson to revise from before reverting to the play-station or the computer. “Teachers need to intervene in the process of forgetting”, he said. We need to help our students to notice, remember and repeat and use new vocabulary in context. As teachers we should model the use of new vocabulary and help students expand on and build in the new phrases. He suggested the idea of a revision questionnaire, using the new words and phrases, in order to start a discussion checking that the usage and meaning is understood. We received a useful handout of revision activities and self-study tips for students. If you are interested to his lecture and read more about the topics discussed, go to www.facebook.com/hughdellarandrewwalkley

John Hird- Grammar: Spoken Grammar and Keeping Grammar Real

“The bigger the distance the more grammar” After reminding us of the various definitions of grammar, John showed us how contextual, conceptual and social distances are examples of how this idea works. By sharing some phrases which his daughter had come away with as she grew up she demonstrated how her grammar developed. It is the same for English language learners. The Grammar Step by step book takes you through a process from the concept (with some nigh impossible choices of answers such as: “Dad went to the pub.” Is he in the pub? A. yes. B don’t know) to the rules (which, as we saw and know, are not as easy as they seem in real life) to the context and real use. It was interesting as a Scot, to read what Google had to say about “The English have never…” as examples of the past perfect tense. In his workshop Jon continued with the grammar theme, this time looking at Spoken Grammar. He reminded us of the characteristics of spoken language – sentences are less complicated often only short utterances, information is separated out and given piece by piece, words are left out, spoken questions differing from written, and non-standard grammar. There were good contributions from the audience with lots of food for thought. Jon’s website is http://jonhird.com/  if you would like to know more.

 

  • December /  Edinburgh / Speaker: Mark Griffiths

 

  • March / Kirkcaldy / Speaker: Kerry Carruthers. Topic: Song and music in the EFL classroom.

 

  • May 2012 / Edinburgh / Speaker: Russell Stannard